The Peripheral Artery Questionnaire

What do I need to know about the PAQ?

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  1. What is the Peripheral Artery Questionnaire?

  2. How did the Peripheral Artery Questionnaire come to be, and why is it named that?

  3. What are the scales in the PAQ, and what do they mean?


  1. What is the Peripheral Artery Questionnaire?

    The Peripheral Artery Questionnaire is the leading health-related quality-of-life measure for patients with peripheral artery disease. It is a reliable, predictive tool that tracks how patients are doing if they have bad circulation in their abdomen, hips, or legs. It has been used in tens of clinical trials involving nearly one hundred sites and thousands of patients.

  2. How did the Peripheral Artery Questionnaire come to be, and why is it named that?

    The Peripheral Questionnaire (PAQ) is Dr. John Spertus’ most recent instrument. He developed it during his research at the Mid-America Heart Institute, but this time left out the name of the city — though he still chose not to include his own name.

    John’s process for creating the PAQ was similar to that of his other instruments:

    1. He constructed the PAQ’s questions using psychological research that explains how patients understand and communicate about their physical conditions.
    2. He defined a statistical analysis approach that correlates patient responses to the questions to other existing data — such as leg angiogram results, for instance.
    3. He performed large-scale validation studies that compared PAQ data against these other data and used these results to further refine the questions.

    This work was done in the mid 2000s, and the PAQ has been in increasing use in research settings ever since. Like the other instruments, its use in regular clinical settings has been limited by the expense and nuisance of using paper forms. It is only recently that enough patients are finally connected to the Internet that it has become possible to offer a service such as the one that MyHealthOutcomes provides for the PAQ.

  3. What are the scales in the PAQ, and what do they mean?

    The answers patients give to the KCCQ’s questions are used to calculate scores in seven scales:

    • Symptoms: a measure of the severity of a patient’s symptoms
    • Stability: a measure of whether a patient’s symptoms are changing over time
    • Physical Function: a measure of the impact of a patient’s symptoms on physical activities
    • Social Function: a measure of the impact of these symptoms on the patient’s interpersonal relationships
    • Treatment Satisfaction: a measure of what a patient thinks of her care
    • Quality of Life: a measure of the overall impact of a patient’s condition on a patient’s interpersonal relationships and state of mind
    • Summary: a combined measure of all the above